Home Health Aides usually have more training (some are called CNAs or Certified Nurses Aides) and can provide some medical services as well as non-medical services (like bathing, light wound care, or blood pressure monitoring). Personal companions provide non-medical care like light housekeeping, light laundry, errand running, transportation, and light meal preparation. 832-271-1600, https://houston-homecare.com Paying…

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Private duty home care agencies will pay the caregiver directly. They will take care of taxes and insurance.  You and your family will not be responsible for these items. If you use a registry, match-maker service or hire a caregiver privately, you will be responsible for taxes, insurance and other requirements. Make sure you know…

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  In some cases long-term care insurance will pay for non-medical home care. Look at the policy for the person needing care. Call the customer service telephone number or call the agent that sold the plan. There is usually (but not always) an elimination period that must be met before long-term care insurance picks up…

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Home Healthcare services are typically medically necessary.  They are paid for by Medicare or other health insurance, and have been ordered by a physician. Private duty home care services are typically companion type services like errand running, light housekeeping, light meal preparation, medication reminders, light laundry, grocery shopping, transportation to MD appointments, going for walks,…

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From time to time caregivers may call in sick, have a flat tire on the way to work, or a family emergency that requires them to take the day off. Ask your home care provider what their plan of action is when a caregiver does not show up for their designated shift. Every home care…

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According to the MetLife Cost of Care study for 2019, the “median” cost of home care in the state of Texas is: Homemaker Services: $21.50 Home Health Aide: $21.63 Paying for In-Home Care Does Medicare or Health Insurance pay for in-home care? Does Long-Term Care Insurance pay for in-home care? How much does home care…

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Many states require special licenses to operate a non-medical home care business. For some states this is only for Medicaid providers, while in other states every provider is licensed. Additionally, the level of care that may be provided varies from state to state. Check with your home care provider (or your state) to find out…

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Businesses that are “bonded” – typically those that work at your home – do background checks on employees. But bonding provides other protections, including coverage if the job is not completed. If the homeowner has missing or broken items like jewelry or other expensive items, they can make a claim on the bond and be…

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All agencies should do a criminal background check on their employees. Some also do additional background checks for history of elder abuse or child abuse. Some agencies do background checks at various times during the caregiver’s employment. Ask your home care agency what types of background checks they do and how often. Paying for In-Home…

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If my aging loved one needs care 24 hours a day, is there a difference in cost between a live-in caregiver and paying for hourly care? Typically live-in care is cheaper than paying for 24 hour care at an hourly rate. According to the 2011 Met Life Cost of Care survey the average daily live-in…

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